Saturday, April 27, 2013

NATO Deputy Commander Inspects New Land Command HQ In Turkey

 via Stop NATO ~ Rick Rozoff


North Atlantic Treaty Organization
Allied Command Operations

April 25, 2013


NATO Deputy Commander: Allied Land Command’s “wheels are burning”
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LANDCOM’s main purpose [is] standardizing doctrine and procedures aimed at making all NATO land forces interoperable to transform toward a contingency paradigm by 2015.

When LANDCOM was activated, the SACEUR told Lt. Gen. Hodges to prepare his headquarters for a possible scenario in which LANDCOM would deploy to help lead a major joint operation (MJO), which would require augmentation with integrated capabilities.

By the fall of 2014, LANDCOM is also required to train and certify the NATO Rapid Deployment Corps for Italy and Spain, as well as the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps…
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1_DSACEUR%20Visit%20to%20Izmir,%20Turkey-Apr%202013_
AIRCOM Commander, U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Ralph Jodice, II, shows British Army General Sir Richard Shirreff, Deputy Supreme Allied Commander for Europe how the Army is taking over the NATO headquarters compound there as Turkish Army Maj. Gen. Ugur Tarcin, LANDCOM Chief of Staff, looks on.

IZMIR, Turkey: The Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe (DSACEUR) visited Allied Land Command (LANDCOM) Headquarters Apr. 19, to receive an update on the command’s progress since it was activated Nov. 30, 2012.

Gen. Sir Richard Shirreff met with the LANDCOM command group and staff, led by Lt. Gen. Frederick “Ben” Hodges, U.S. Army. 

Gen. Sherriff said the establishment of LANDCOM was the “most exciting development in NATO in the last 20 years.” He said he was impressed by how LANDCOM had progressed so quickly since its inception that its “wheels are burning.”

Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Col. Gordon Falconer of the British Army, explained LANDCOM’s vision and the command’s campaign plan comprised of three lines of operation (LOO): achieving operational readiness as a component headquarters, ensuring NATO land force operational capability, and advocating on behalf of land power to the public. 

“As you can see, our main effort is outward-focused,” said Falconer, referring to LANDCOM’s main purpose for standardizing doctrine and procedures aimed at making all NATO land forces interoperable to transform toward a contingency paradigm by 2015.

As Gen. Shirreff was briefed about LANDCOM’s timeline to reach full operational capability (FOC) by Dec. 2014, Lt. Gen. Hodges told him that the command was actively working with the Supreme Headquarters for Allied Powers in Europe (SHAPE) to define the conditions for initial operational capability (IOC) and FOC.

Hodges replied, “We need to get 70% of the personnel the nations have committed to providing us by IOC, and I’m thrilled by the quality of the people we are receiving. It is not just about getting a body, but the right person for the job to perform the tasks and functions of the position.”

This, he explained, illustrates the importance of land advocacy, and why he visits the military staff colleges, like the NATO Defence College in Naples, Italy and Combined General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS, where future LANDCOM headquarters staff officers are educated.


When LANDCOM was activated, the SACEUR told Lt. Gen. Hodges to prepare his headquarters for a possible scenario in which LANDCOM would deploy to help lead a major joint operation (MJO), which would require augmentation with integrated capabilities. So the staff quickly devised a concept and introduced the proposal during the Land Component Commanders’ Conference here last March in order to understand the requirements and reach consensus on how to form a land-centric JTF. 

“This is exactly what this alliance needs,” stated Gen. Shirreff, who then advised LANDCOM’s leadership to continue to steer the debate toward “a pragmatic and practical solution.” He complimented them on presenting a “brilliant piece of work.”
By the fall of 2014, LANDCOM is also required to train and certify the NATO Rapid Deployment Corps for Italy and Spain, as well as the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps. But LANDCOM’s road to FOC has many speed bumps along the way.


By the briefing’s conclusion, Lt. Gen. Hodges told him that all nine corps commands in the NFS have said that they are glad there is a LANDCOM will provide standards and advocacy for NATO’s land forces and ensure they retain effectiveness and interoperability post-ISAF. 

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